How they Was Rappinā€™ in 1998

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ICYMI: Check out ourĀ previous entries/playlists from the 1990s:

Back again with our first AutumnĀ šŸ‚Ā  entry into our 90s playlist series. Hopefully, you’ve been enjoying these tracks as much as we’ve had compiling them – they’ve certainly provided a much needed trip down memory lane (sittin’ in da park)!

Now that we’re spotlighting the 1998 calendar, it’s a little sad knowing we’re approaching the conclusion of this particular series. However, as I run through these tracks, I’m again reminded that there’s no question which decade has provided us with the most quality and diversity in hip-hop.

By this time, rap music had strengthened its grip upon mainstream culture and was establishing itself as a dominating force. The genre had become more lucrative than ever, and due to this, the number of rap acts had exploded. With regional acts across the United States putting their cities on the map with the movements they were creating, this playlist is our longest and most comprehensive yet at 50 tracks and 3 hours and 40 minutes in length (!) – and STILL, we’re missing a few!

Nevertheless, please get ready to kick back, relax, turn the bass up, and enjoy… can you believe that in a couple months time, we’ll be celebrating the 20th anniversary of these bangers!?Ā šŸ¤Æ

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The best rapper of 1998 (according to Complex) : DMX

As always, Spotify (@Spotify) comes through with the dreaded license restrictions, though in actuality, we had to purposefully omit a few joints that came to mind just to ensure we didn’t get too far away from our hard cap of 50 tracks!

Ideally, we would have included these cuts among the others:

Brand Nubian ā€“ Foundation

Company Flow ā€“ End to End Burners

DJ Honda ā€“ hII

Funkdoobiest ā€“ the Troubleshooters

Lyricist Lounge, Volume One

Ras KassĀ ā€“Ā Rasassination

RZA ā€“ RZA as Bobby Digital in Stereo

  • Brand Nubian: The last great Nubian album (in my opinion), and quite possibly, my personal favourite. Some of the best beats they’ve ever spit over, too, with the likes of Buckwild (@BUCKWILD_DITC), Lord Finesse (@LordFinesseDITC), DJ Premier (@REALDJPREMIER), and Diamond D (@diamondditc) lacing the Five Percenters appropriately.
  • Company Flow: End to End Burners goes down as one of the last tracks Co-Flow would release as a full group which would eventually pave the way for the birth of Definitive Jux.
  • DJ Honda: Honda‘s (@djhonda) debut was phenomenal and his sophomore record has everything the first one did…except it does all those same things even better! The track with Mos is an all-time hip-hop classic.
  • Funkdoobiest: The first Doobie record without DJ Muggs (@dj_muggs) and Tomahawk Funk is a lot better than most remember it to be – I fux heavy with the Squirrel Nut Zippers (@snzippers) sample in Papa Chulo, ha!
  • Lyricist Lounge: Most heads understand that Lyricist Lounge was an institution in rap, one that served as a launchpad for several legendary careers in hip-hop. In particular, theĀ Indelibles were something of a rap supergroup, the styles of whom would heavily inform the independent “backpack” scene that would go on to dominate the underground for the majority of the 2000s.
  • Ras Kass: I’ll be damned if Ras (@RasKass) isn’t one of the most overlooked rappers of all-time. At the very least, he’s definitely a cat on the West Coast who doesn’t come anywhere near to getting his just due. Though he’s still making music, it’s a real shame that his first two classic albums aren’t available on Spotify.
  • RZA: The first non-Rakeem RZA (@RZA) solo record may have divided opinion upon its release but it has actually aged quite gracefully. Listening to it in 2017, it’s humorous thinking back to a time when this album wasn’t considered “Wu-Tang” enough – if only they knew where the group was heading…

1998 was a TOUGH year and at 50 tracks, we can only hope we included tracks from the most integral artists. How did we do? Did we miss anything?

Don’t forget, you canĀ FOLLOW ALL OF THE INDIVIDUAL PLAYLISTS ON SPOTIFY – grab ’em in the links at the top of this post if you’re just catching up!

When we return, we’ll be highlighting the best tracks from the last year in our previous millennium – oooo-weeee!Ā āœˆļøĀ 1āƒ£ļøĀ 9āƒ£ļøĀ 9āƒ£ļøĀ 9āƒ£ļø

NEXT UP: How they Was Rappinā€™ in 1999! šŸŽ¤

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How they Was Rappinā€™ in 1993

93rapcollage

ICYMI: Check out ourĀ previous entries/playlists centred uponĀ 1991 and 1992, respectively!

Back again with a new retrospective rap playlist forĀ all of you Spotify (@Spotify) streamers out there, this time with a focus upon the landmarkĀ year of 1993. So much good music came out at this time that I had to bump the playlist upĀ from 35 tracks to 40. This makes this iterationĀ approximately 20 minutes longer than its predecessors –Ā I doubt the heads will complain!

Subsequent to my 1992 post going up, I made the decisionĀ toĀ moveĀ all futureĀ installments away from #WaybackWednesdayĀ in order toĀ position them asĀ #ThrowbackThursday posts going forward. However, upon awaking to the horrific news of Chris Cornell‘s (@chriscornell) unfortunate passing last week, I instead spent the previous Thursday reminiscing to Soundgarden‘s (@soundgarden) unbelievableĀ back-catalogue for the majority of the day (as well as several more thereafter). Another once-in-a-generation talent gone far too soon. R.I.P.Ā šŸ’”

Now, the last thing I want to do is turn this into a somber post when I’ve got such a badass playlist on tap for you. So grab some headphones and take a trekĀ back throughĀ one of the most solidĀ years ever in hip-hop!

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The best rapper of 1993Ā (according to Complex) : SNOOP DOGGY DOGG

Again, due toĀ SpotifyĀ and the unfortunate limitations presented byĀ its catalogue, we’re missing a fewĀ key inclusions taken from the following critical albums:

Akinyele ā€“Ā Vagina Diner

De La SoulĀ ā€“Ā Buhloone Mindstate

Funkdoobiest – Which Doobie U B?

IllegalĀ ā€“Ā the Untold Truth

Mobb DeepĀ ā€“Ā Juvenile Hell

the Roots – Organix

Tragedy Khadafi – Tragedy: Saga of a Hoodlum

It’s also a real shame Spotify doesn’t have the remix toĀ LL Cool J‘s (@llcoolj) “Pink Cookies” (as seen below). The original is tight but this beat here cooks…Ā šŸ”„

In particular, of the albums above, it really sucks to see that Akinyele album missing from the Spotify catalogue – in my opinion, it’s arguably the best completeĀ production that Large Professor (@PLargePro) has ever put out. More people need to hear it – it’s now out of print but still holds up!

On the other hand, I prefer the album version to the above Illegal track more than I doĀ its video counterpart. Go figure.

One way or another, at 40 tracks deep, I feelĀ this is a thoroughĀ playlistĀ that does a fairly comprehensiveĀ job overall of covering the keyĀ highlights throughout the entirety of year.

Really hope you dig this tripĀ back toĀ 1993 –Ā a milestone year forĀ the genre! If you enjoy it, please beĀ sure to click to ‘follow’ the playlist!

NEXT UP: How they Was Rappinā€™ in 1994! šŸŽ¤

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